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jonathan barnett
October 26th, 2010, 10:44 PM
This report (http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/26/health/26cases.html) from the New York Times is a real tear-jerker about the trials and tribulations of AIDS case workers trying to persuade people to keep taking their antiretrovirals.

A 29-year-old woman tries to explain to the AIDS case worker why she doesn't return to the clinic:


Yes, she acknowledged to Peter Ouma Mchembere, a young counselor from a local H.I.V./AIDS project, she hadn’t returned to the clinic for her antiretroviral medications in more than a year; no, she didn’t plan to come back anytime soon.
She disliked the drugs, she explained: “The first time I started taking them, I was having the feeling that my heart was pounding and I had no strength.” These days, she said, she chose to rely on prayer instead of medicine to give her strength so she could care for her two young children.

Rather than sympathizing with the patient, the article paints her as irresponsible:


“It’s very painful,” Peter said to me after we left her home. “She has two kids and they’re at a tender age, and if she dies, who’ll take care of them?” We are to pity, not the patients who find the drugs intolerable, but the care workers, who are presumably being paid a salary to track down non-compliant patients and persuade them to take their pills with an ever-expanding arsenal of enticements or threats.

Recently, the "loss to followup" in Africa has been increasing, according to this report, and is now "15-40%" within "1-3 years" of starting treatment. With a range of statistics like those, it's really anyone's guess about how many people there are not taking their drugs.

When the hammer of threats fails to get patients to comply, case workers can optionally offer a carrot instead. Some patients are even being compensated financially (bribed) to take their medicine with "modest projects to raise patients’ income and stabilize their lives, like creating a microfinance system to provide water pumps and other agricultural support to help them grow more crops."

I never cease to be amazed at how differently I read articles like this one once I've removed the filters of AIDS brainwashing. I have so many questions.

If such huge numbers of patients are non-compliant with their drugs, how can the programs be working successfully, as touted elsewhere? Where is the massive increase in deaths? Where is that boogey man called "resistance"?

Where is the reality check from the author? Does anyone think to ask if those presumed to be compliant are really taking their drugs? How many Africans report to the clinic, collect their payment for next year's crop and then throw the pills away? Or sell them to youth who smoke them for a high?

This article makes me shake my head, but probably not for the reasons the author intended.

G Man
October 27th, 2010, 04:58 AM
I had this happen to me, the clinic trying to track me down asking why I hadn't been in, worried that I wasn't getting 'proper treatment'.

The HIV specialist ended up calling me. I told her flat out that after further research I didn't believe HIV caused AIDS and wasn't interested in any meds. You could have heard a pin drop after that, total silence. Then I asked her to please not call me again and to remove me from any lists they had, thanked her and hung up the phone.

The only way I found to get out of the 'AIDS Zone' was to cut myself off from it completely. No more tests, no more drugs, no more clinics, no more HIV specialists. Seems to be working rather well!

Brian Carter
October 28th, 2010, 07:22 AM
G,
My experience mirrors similar to yours and they tried calling a couple of times and all I did was skirt around the issue and said I was too busy at work to make an appointment. They eventually stopped calling.


The only way I found to get out of the 'AIDS Zone' was to cut myself off from it completely

Bravo! However, this is not so easy for many questioners. It almost calls for a serious self-dehypnotizing effort, but can be done by immersing oneself into all there is to know.

truth84
November 2nd, 2010, 12:29 AM
Good job, G Man. The best three words to remember: "Just say 'NO'." Treat them like debt collectors. Don't answer the phone, don't respond to them, and don't give them any information. If these case workers get so bold as to show up to your house, give them a "friendly" armed escort to the end of your property line.

Aion
November 3rd, 2010, 11:50 AM
Where is the reality check from the author? Does anyone think to ask if those presumed to be compliant are really taking their drugs? How many Africans report to the clinic, collect their payment for next year's crop and then throw the pills away? Or sell them to youth who smoke them for a high?

This article makes me shake my head, but probably not for the reasons the author intended.

They know, they just don't care. They're not paid to question, not paid to think, not paid to see what's right in front of them.